Moxibustion

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013

Moxibustion is a traditional Chinese therapy that uses moxa made from dried mugwort. It can be used indirectly as a moxa stick or burnt on the patient’s skin. Moxa is applied to the acupuncture points stimulating circulation, thus inducing a smoother flow of blood and qi. I use moxa in conjunction with acupuncture for cold and deficient...

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Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) it is understood that all disease is the result of disharmony. The disharmony may be in: the qi and blood system the yin/yang balance an organ (Zang fu) a meridian, or the interaction between the human body and the environment. Qi and blood are closely associated. When qi moves blood will flow after it. If you have pain this means there is qi and blood stagnation, i.e. qi and blood are not flowing smoothly through your body. When blood and qi flow harmoniously the body receives good nourishment and will recover more quickly from injury or disease. Yin (blood) is the material foundation of Yang (mind). If your body has abundant blood you will be naturally content. Your mental well-being is dependent on the quality of blood in your body. In TCM each organ is associated with a different emotion, and this is another way of looking at the relationship between body and mind. Emotional disturbances interfere with proper organ function — strong negative emotions distract organs from doing their jobs. Therefore, excessive or prolonged emotional disturbance will lead to disease. Conversely, if one of your organs is compromised (in disharmony, or not functioning properly), you will be prone to experiencing the emotion related to that organ. For example, a disharmony of the Liver organ will tend to make you irritable; habitual worrying may be caused by either a disharmony of the spleen or a weakness of the stomach. Meridians are energy pathways through which qi flows to nourish and energise the human body. There are twelve primary meridians, each corresponding to a different organ. Along with the twelve primary meridians there are eight extraordinary meridians which present a deeper level of energetic structuring. When the qi associated with a particular organ system is in a condition of excess, deficiency or stagnation, this may cause a blockage or imbalance in the flow of qi, resulting in disease. Acupuncture treatment corrects imbalance in the flow of qi and resolves blockage, thereby allowing the body’s correct function to be restored. Your environment and lifestyle will also affect your health. Stress, overwork, lack of sleep or nutritional deficiencies are just some ways in which your environment will impact on your body. Climatic factors (sudden temperature changes etc.) may also cause diseases: when the body’s protective qi is weak the body can’t adapt to environmental change. Ongoing environmental challenges cause disharmony or imbalance. As well as giving you treatment to correct these imbalances, your TCM practitioner may offer dietary or lifestyle advice. Different patterns of disharmony require different treatment. In order to determine which pattern is present a TCM practitioner will take your pulses, examine your tongue and ask questions about general body function. Where Western medicine tends to treat the disease, TCM treats the individual. This means a TCM practitioner won’t necessarily treat two people with the...

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About Sachie

Posted by on Jun 24, 2013

I was born on Shikoku Island, where people from all over Japan come to visit the famous 88 temples built 1250 years ago by a charismatic monk named Kouboudaishi. Because the island is a place of pilgrimage, people from Shikoku are known for their hospitality and willingness to help those in need. Natural medicine has always been used on Shikoku. As a child I remember gathering herbs with my grandmother. She taught me how to use plants and moxa for healing. From my mother I learned shiatsu massage. Shiatsu uses acupressure points and is a healing massage. Using herbs and massage to heal ourselves and others is a part of the culture in Shikoku. For ten years I worked as a beautician, first in Tokyo and then in other parts of Japan. I often did shiatsu for my clients because it helps the body stay young. I came to New Zealand in 1995 and fell in love with the beautiful natural environment. I gained residency in 1997. At first I worked in a souvenir shop and later in an organic grocery. In 2007 I began training as an acupuncturist at the New Zealand College of Chinese Medicine. I knew this was the right decision because I needed to be doing something I felt passionate about. I feel passionate about acupuncture because it is a healing profession, one which gives me an opportunity to serve others. I enjoy listening to people in order to find out how to best meet their needs. I have been doing this for most of my life, and it feels natural to be doing it now as an acupuncturist. I love to meet new people and hear about their physical and/or mental/emotional problems. As humans we are all unique, and yet have so much in common with one another. When I treat a person it feels like I have touched an individual life; it gives me a sense of awe and respect. As I practise acupuncture I try to integrate all that life has taught me. Likewise, in my day-to-day life I try to apply the principles of acupuncture. My knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been of great benefit to me, and has perhaps even saved my life. It gives me practical guidance for maintaining my physical, mental and emotional health. It has also made me skilled in observing myself and others. I feel honoured to be able to share my knowledge of TCM with my clients. Qualifications Bachelor of Health Science (acupuncture) from New Zealand College of Chinese medicine Diploma in Acupuncture from New Zealand College of Chinese Medicine Member of the New Zealand Register of Acupuncturists Approved ACC Provider Contact me Add a TestimonialEmail is not publishedTestimonial *HTML Allowed : a p br i em strong q h1-h6* RequiredAdd a...

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Acupuncture

Posted by on May 23, 2013

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is an important part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Acupuncture is a non-invasive treatment with a very low risk of side-effects. It uses very fine, sterile, disposable needles, which are inserted just below the surface of the skin. This does not cause pain, although you may feel a qi sensation. When the needles penetrate the skin, qi is stimulated. Stimulated qi will move, and blood will flow after qi. Acupuncture corrects qi and blood stagnation, and therefore relieves pain. The aim of acupuncture is to help qi and blood flow harmoniously through the body, thus nourishing the body and bringing it back into balance. Learn more on the conditions or problems Acupuncture can help...

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